4DX for Musicians, Discipline 4: Rhythm of Accountability

Congratulations! Through diligent reading you moved from 60% to 80% completion. What can you commit to doing to move the score to 100%? Why “Cadence of Accountability” A compelling scoreboard only counts when you consistently play the game. That’s what Discipline 4 does for you. Your cadence of accountability keeps you honest and provides satisfaction for a job

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4DX for Musicians, Discipline 3: Keep Score

Hey there 60% rockstar goal-achiever! Think about it. You know exactly what you want, and it’s wildly important to your cause. You have control of the game with lead measures. You know the lag measure that signals you’re winning the game. Isn’t it time to put up the scoreboard and start making points? Define a system No

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Business Acronym WIG as Wildly Important Goals

4DX for Musicians, Discipline 1: Focus on the Wildly Important

Let’s review: You kept your commitment to read 4 main points. Great job! Your completion score moved from 0% to 20%. Want to keep winning? Understanding Wildly Important Goals A wildly important goal (WIG) is: A goal that can make a big difference. From an area where the greatest results are desired. 4DX WIGs have a finish line stated as “From X

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4 Disciplines of Execution (4DX) for Musicians – Intro

(You’re 0% done.. eep!) Ever struggle to follow through on goals or ideas? Do you wish you had an easy, systematic way to turn your vision into reality? #1 Best-selling book The 4 Disciplines of Execution provides an epically awesome framework for setting and achieving clear, meaningful goals. In fact, I used 4DX to stay on track writing this blog

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Small Business Accounting 101: Why does Dr stand for Debit

Going from a musician to a CEO meant I needed to deepen my accounting knowledge. As I studied, one thing bothered me: “Why does Dr stand for Debit?” My favorite free accounting tutorial explains the history of the abbreviations “Dr” and “Cr” for “Debit” and “Credit”. The terms debit and credit originated from the Latin terms “debere” or “debitum”

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